MPAA Victory in Rossi Case

By Jon Newton 5/03/05

The owner of a movie web site in Hawaii says the US Supreme Court has opened a “Pandora’s Box” by ruling in favour of the MPAA in a Lord of the Rings case.

Mike Rossi’s InternetMovies.com was offering Return of the King, claimed the MPAA (Motion Picture Association of America ).

Rossi subsequently received a Cease & Desist order under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) and was forced to take his site offline.


Jon Newton

He counter-sued, pointing out the movie hadn’t even been made, but in Rossi vs MPAA, the court agreed with the MPAA that it had nonetheless acted in good faith.

"Believing material from the future is downloadable is now a valid and reasonable belief that protects copyright holders to continue to abuse the 'shoot now, ask later' good faith belief in the DMCA,” says Rossi.

“A Pandora's box of troubles for web site owners and individuals is open," Rossi continued. "I am very sad to see that American rights have been an illusion all this time.”

Is this the end?

“Yes,” Rossi told p2pnet.

“I’ve extinguished all my avenues to receive justice. If there were some higher court I would appeal but there isn't. It makes me sad to think that our rights in America have been just an illusion. It's unfortunate that I couldn't put a stop to copyright holders falsely accusing people of crimes they haven't committed.

“I don’t believe asking the Supreme Court to make the good faith belief objective was to much to ask for. But unfortunately they see copyrights as being more important than constitutional rights.

“In Hollywood we trust.”

 

Jon Newton is the editor of p2pnet.net and is a regular contributer to MP3 Newswire. Jon's site is devoted to the politics of digital music and his insights as well as those of his co-writers can be read there. We urge you to explore it.

 


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Other MP3 stories:

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What Makes a Journalist? Thoughts on Apple and Think Secret
Can Free Broadcast TV Really Be Napsterized?

 

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